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everydayhybridity:

Those following the skateboard scene in Hong Kong will know that there has been problems over the last 6 weeks with a new mandatory helmet rule at 4 of the major skateparks. Last night saw the scene above from which you can see the short video on instagram. Skateboarders at Lai Chi Kok skatepark who were not wearing helmets were met with a group of police and a police dog.
It is an intimidating scene to have in a space specifically designed for skateboarders. To compound the issue this very skatepark has been used, without the mandatory helmet rule, for the last 13 years.

everydayhybridity:

Those following the skateboard scene in Hong Kong will know that there has been problems over the last 6 weeks with a new mandatory helmet rule at 4 of the major skateparks. Last night saw the scene above from which you can see the short video on instagram. Skateboarders at Lai Chi Kok skatepark who were not wearing helmets were met with a group of police and a police dog.

It is an intimidating scene to have in a space specifically designed for skateboarders. To compound the issue this very skatepark has been used, without the mandatory helmet rule, for the last 13 years.

Video

MOST SHOCKING SECOND A DAY / SAVE THE CHILDREN from Burning Flag on Vimeo.

A young girl’s life gets turned upside-down in this tragic second a day video. Could this ever happen in the UK? This is what war does to children.

Brand / Save The Children / bit.ly/3yearson

Agency / Don’t Panic London / dontpaniclondon.com

Production Company / UNIT9 Films / unit9.com

Director / Martin Stirling / martinstirling.com/Martin_Stirling/Home.html

Editor / Alex Burt

Producer / Elliott Tagg & Geoff Morgan

DOP / Jacob Proud (Burning Flag) / burning-flag.com

Post Production / Smoke & Mirrors

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Lunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2 - A closer look, a set on Flickr.I’m so happy & proud to receive a pair of these NikeSB Lunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2’s -  Thank you Brian!  Congratulations again on this amazing release!
This is the 3rd collaboration between Hong Kong skateboard institution 8Five2 Shop & NikeSB Stefan Janoski
This special version commemorates 8Five2 shop’s 15th Anniversary, & comes in black patent leather with white details, black leather laces; the custom 85ive2 ‘never in the club’ cork insoles, custom embossing on the heel on NikeSB’s super comfy Lunarlon outsole.
For more info, check out www.8five2.com
Lunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2 - A closer lookLunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2 - A closer lookLunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2 - A closer lookLunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2 - A closer look

Lunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2 - A closer look, a set on Flickr.

I’m so happy & proud to receive a pair of these NikeSB Lunar Stefan Janoski 85ive2’s - Thank you Brian! Congratulations again on this amazing release!

This is the 3rd collaboration between Hong Kong skateboard institution 8Five2 Shop & NikeSB Stefan Janoski

This special version commemorates 8Five2 shop’s 15th Anniversary, & comes in black patent leather with white details, black leather laces; the custom 85ive2 ‘never in the club’ cork insoles, custom embossing on the heel on NikeSB’s super comfy Lunarlon outsole.

For more info, check out www.8five2.com
Video

Transformers X 85ive2 Skateboard Collab from Anthony Claravall on Vimeo.

Dan Leung “Soundwave”, Chun Chai “Optimus Prime”, Jeff Gonzales “Bumblebee”, Official Hasbro Transformers and 85ive2 shop pro boards are available now at 8five2.com.

Video

Transformers X 85ive2 Skateboard Collab

Link Skateboarding as a Culture: Skatepark Etiquette

everydayhybridity:

There is increasing recognition of skateboarding as a culture and part of this popular recognition comes from the construction and use of skateparks. The designed exclusion of skateboarders from the city has been matched with the provision of specifically made places to skate, these being…

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vansskate:

On this most solemn day please take a moment to reflect on all the beautiful lives that were lost on September 11th, 2001. Never Forget.
Photo: Omeally

vansskate:

On this most solemn day please take a moment to reflect on all the beautiful lives that were lost on September 11th, 2001. Never Forget.

Photo: Omeally

Video

Introducing Hyperlapse from Instagram from Instagram on Vimeo.

Introducing Hyperlapse from Instagram: a new app that lets you capture high-quality time lapse videos even while in motion.

For more information, check out the following resources:
- Read more at our blog: blog.instagram.com
- Visit our Hyperlapse from Instagram FAQ: help.instagram.com/hyperlapse
- Download Hyperlapse for iOS here: itunes.apple.com/app/id740146917

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everydayhybridity:

Skateboarding in Hong Kong - Helmets and the LCSD
Yesterday Warren Stuart and I were on RTHK Radio 3 discussing Skateboard Culture in Hong Kong and the new rules at 4 public skateparks in the territory that make wearing helmets mandatory. You can listen to the interview here.
There has been a number of issues with these rules. In many cases they have been ignored or rejected by users who are circumventing the new policy in a variety of ways. There has also been a noted decline in the number of users in some skateparks in the territory. In one case the Lai Chi Kok skatepark that has been open for 13 years without the enforcement of any helmet rule has basically become empty.
The introduction of the rule raises a considerable number of issues.
A large amount of public money has been spent on construction of these skateparks. They have been built for the community and are free to use. At the same time they provide an alternative to the street which can be a dangerous and problematic place for skateboarders to use. The street is also an uncontrolled environment for younger teenagers. With the introduction of unpopular rules skateboarders are eschewing the skateparks for the streets
Safety issues. In many ways helmets are regarded as a much safer option for skateboarders, BMX, and rollerbladers. However, part of skateboard culture rejects rules such as these. Skateboarders for example may not wear a helmet when they are skating ledges and small transitions but will choose to wear a helmet when skate larger vert obstacles. The imposition of rules my non-skaters has always been met with suspicion by skateboarders. A key part of skate culture is that skateboarders try and manage and control it.
Park usage. There are 2 new skateparks that have big bowls that take up roughly a quarter of the total park size. However these have never been open to the public. Even with the introduction of the new helmet rule the large bowls remain closed unless an organisation books them for an event. Then only members of that organisation can officially use the booked bowl. One has to question how skateboarders in Hong Kong can ever acquire the skills to ride these bowls in such situations.
The previous policy of the parks that required users to sign in and provide a waver had no issues. This method also provided the LCSD with data on how many users accessed the park, their ages, and genders. In sum an excellent tool to see who the parks are servicing. Since the introduction of the helmet rule no further data on numbers of users is being collected and they therefore have no firm numbers about the effect of the new policy.
Many are in favour of a reversion to the previous arrangement. In this way helmet use was optional, but recommended and users could sign themselves in. It remains to be seen how things will develop from this point on.

Skateboarding in HK, Helmets & the LCSD - Paul & I were on RTHK Radio 3 to talk about this issue

everydayhybridity:

Skateboarding in Hong Kong - Helmets and the LCSD

Yesterday Warren Stuart and I were on RTHK Radio 3 discussing Skateboard Culture in Hong Kong and the new rules at 4 public skateparks in the territory that make wearing helmets mandatory. You can listen to the interview here.

There has been a number of issues with these rules. In many cases they have been ignored or rejected by users who are circumventing the new policy in a variety of ways. There has also been a noted decline in the number of users in some skateparks in the territory. In one case the Lai Chi Kok skatepark that has been open for 13 years without the enforcement of any helmet rule has basically become empty.

The introduction of the rule raises a considerable number of issues.

  • A large amount of public money has been spent on construction of these skateparks. They have been built for the community and are free to use. At the same time they provide an alternative to the street which can be a dangerous and problematic place for skateboarders to use. The street is also an uncontrolled environment for younger teenagers. With the introduction of unpopular rules skateboarders are eschewing the skateparks for the streets
  • Safety issues. In many ways helmets are regarded as a much safer option for skateboarders, BMX, and rollerbladers. However, part of skateboard culture rejects rules such as these. Skateboarders for example may not wear a helmet when they are skating ledges and small transitions but will choose to wear a helmet when skate larger vert obstacles. The imposition of rules my non-skaters has always been met with suspicion by skateboarders. A key part of skate culture is that skateboarders try and manage and control it.
  • Park usage. There are 2 new skateparks that have big bowls that take up roughly a quarter of the total park size. However these have never been open to the public. Even with the introduction of the new helmet rule the large bowls remain closed unless an organisation books them for an event. Then only members of that organisation can officially use the booked bowl. One has to question how skateboarders in Hong Kong can ever acquire the skills to ride these bowls in such situations.
  • The previous policy of the parks that required users to sign in and provide a waver had no issues. This method also provided the LCSD with data on how many users accessed the park, their ages, and genders. In sum an excellent tool to see who the parks are servicing. Since the introduction of the helmet rule no further data on numbers of users is being collected and they therefore have no firm numbers about the effect of the new policy.

Many are in favour of a reversion to the previous arrangement. In this way helmet use was optional, but recommended and users could sign themselves in. It remains to be seen how things will develop from this point on.

Skateboarding in HK, Helmets & the LCSD - Paul & I were on RTHK Radio 3 to talk about this issue